THE TEAM

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Megan Jacobs

Megan is a palaeontology postgraduate student at the University of Portsmouth working on ichthyosaurs from the Late Jurassic of Kimmeridge, Dorset. Previous research has focused on mid-Cretaceous pterosaurs and small theropods from the famous Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Growing up on the Isle of Wight, Megan spent most of her childhood fossil collecting with her father, and over the last 17 years has amassed a large collection and helped with excavating dinosaurs on the island’s south coast. Megan has made many important finds, such as a partial crocodilian and a possible Eotyrannus tooth (both displayed at Dinosaur Expeditions C.I.C). In recent years, Megan has undertaken fieldwork in Morocco, Texas, Germany, Wales and Dorset. She is an experienced fossil guide on the island’s beaches with providing guided walks for over 3 years.

 

 

 

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Theo Vickers

Theo is a marine biology undergraduate at the University Of Portsmouth and a qualified Marine Mammal Surveyor. Born on the Island and collecting fossils from the age of 6, Theo has made several scientifically important and rare finds and is an experienced local fossil hunter and guide, with an in-depth knowledge of the Island’s geology and palaeontology. Theo’s main interests are the Island’s fossil mammals, and in 2017 he stumbled upon the tooth of a rare hornless rhinoceros on the Island’s northwest coast, one of only several specimens to ever be found in the UK. When not diligently searching the Island’s beaches for the remains of prehistoric life, Theo is studying at university, with a key interest in the ecology and evolution of large vertebrates, particularly marine mammals.

 

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Jack Wonfor

Jack is a lifelong fossil collector with a keen interest in our abundant Cretaceous ammonites and other marine molluscs. From a young age, Jack has accumulated a vast collection of museum quality specimens. In 2018 Jack disovered a large fossil nautilus from Rocken End, which can now be seen on display at Dinosaur Isle Museum!